Product Spotlight

COP.pngCopaiba is the star of today’s show. The copaiba tree is of the fabaceae family (commonly known as the legume, pea, or bean family). Young Living Cobaiba Essential Oil is made by tapping the gum resin from the copaiba tree in Brazil and then steam distilling the resin to produce the essential oil. Some other companies sell copaiba “oil” that contains the entire resin or is a distilled form of the leaf. Young Living’s Copaiba oil is impressive for its high levels of beta-caryophyllene (up to 55%), a natural substance that has been studied for its effects on the body’s response to irritation.

Historically Copaiba oil-resins have been applied in folk medicine by the natives of north and northeastern Brazil, in the treatment of various diseases. Studies(1) have shown that the beneficial effects of Copaiba are due to its antiinflamatory, antitumor, antitetanus, antiseptic and antiblenorrhagea properties.

Young Living includes this popular oil in their Premium Starter Kit. I have to admit; when I first got my kit, I wasn’t quite sure what to do with this oil. If this is you…look no further!

Here are some ways to use Young Living Copaiba essential oil*.

  • Add to a roller or diffuse with lemon, peppermint, and lavender for respiratory support.
  • Known as an magnifier, add to another oil to kick it up a notch.
  • Apply with a carrier oil to support healthy muscle, joint or cartilage function and ease minor discomforts.
  • Add with peppermint or Panaway for head support.
  • Rub diluted along jaw line to ease mouth discomfort.
  • Add a drop to your daily moisturizer or to areas of concern for rejuvenating skin support.
  • Add to your shampoo or conditioner to promote healthy hair.

What are some ways that you use this oil? Share with us in the comments below.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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(1)Genotoxicity assessment of Copaiba oil and its fractions in Swiss mice. Genetics and Molecular Biology Mara Ribeiro Almeida, Joana D’Arc Castania Darin, Lívia Cristina Hernandes, Mônica Freiman de Souza Ramos, Lusânia Maria Greggi Antunes, Osvaldo de Freitas; Aug 2, 2012

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